Wednesday, May 1, 2013

The Writer's Voice Entry



Query:

Dear Coaches,

Fifteen-year-old Caraway (Cara) knows her place in life. She’s the daughter of one of England’s most prominent Earls. Like any other lady of her time, she’ll marry a noble and uphold the respected Godwin name. But Cara isn’t like other ladies. She can see the faeries. And this isn’t just any time in England. This is the tenuous year before the Norman Conquest. Character driven with a strong female voice, I AM CARAWAY is a young adult historical fantasy complete at 112,000 words. It gives a new perspective on faerie folklore—just how evil these creatures really were and what made them all disappear.

Seven years after narrowly escaping death, rumors of her father’s declining reputation are the only thing Cara has to worry about—that is until the evil faerie that almost killed her comes back. Then Thorn shows up. He’s the faerie that abandoned Cara on that day when she was eight. Thorn tells her she’s a part of a prophecy and if she doesn’t fulfill her fate, the faeries will end mankind.

In order to learn the details of her destiny, Cara and Thorn set off on a journey across England—a journey strife with secrets, lies, witches, and faeries. And while Cara’s father incites the Norman Invasion, Cara and Thorn fall into a love that is forbidden. But then Thorn betrays Cara, forcing her into the hands of her worst nightmare. If she can stay alive and fulfill the shocking details of the prophecy, Cara will forever change the course of human history.

I'm a stay-at-home mom with a BA in Journalism and an Amazon "Books I Love" list of over 400 YA novels! Fans of Philippa Gregory, Melissa Marr, and Julie Kagawa will enjoy my novel as it has the timeless feel of a historical blended with the darkness of evil faeries and layered with a breathtaking romance between two people who couldn't be more wrong yet more right for each other.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,
Christie Murillo


First 250:



Chapter 1 
Early June, 1065 

My body is careful and my breathing is quiet as I inch closer to the sitting room door. I can hear Pa saying something but his voice sounds far away. He must be on the other side of the room, facing the window. I press my ear against the cold wood and steady myself with a hand. Silence hangs heavy in the air.
“Just say it Gertrud. What did you find out? What did the pythonissa see?”  
I jerk back, alarmed at the roughness in Pa’s voice. It seems like his agitation has gotten worse these last few years. He never used to talk to us that way. But lately all he does is pace and frown and bark orders. And ever since we left the ceremony this morning he’s been especially distracted and edgy. Gertrud disappeared on some errand after that. When she returned and went straight to the sitting room with my parents, I decided I had to find out what was going on. Eavesdropping seemed like the best way. 
“It’s alright, Gertrud. Just tell us.” Mum’s voice, nice and calm.  
“It was her.” I can almost see Gertrud wringing her hands in nervousness. “This is her destiny. She is the one who will save us. The pythonissa said they will kill us all.”  
Pa says something I can’t hear. I think he asks a question because his voice rises in pitch. Gertrud’s voice is quiet. “Yes, she was certain. And it makes sense too—with all the nightmares and after what happened…it will occur after the cold season.”